Saturday, October 7, 2017

Daily Inspiration 10-7-17

"It is not through struggle and effort 
and trying that resistance is released, 
but instead through distraction 
and releasing and relaxing." 

-- Abraham, Esther Hicks 



[Classic post from 3-18-15]

A long time ago, I was the equivalent of a journeyman level auto mechanic. I had two years of auto shop in high school and then became an auto mechanic in the Air Force working on cars, and a lot of trucks big and small. Knowing what I know from that hands-on experience, I so appreciate a good auto mechanic today. Cars have steadily become more a combination of sophisticated electronics and even more complicated mechanical features, let alone, a plethora of options that didn't exist when I was a mechanic. My hat is off to them.

It can be a frustrating experience to diagnose a situation and then have the solution be incorrect, or insufficient. Trying to find out what the onboard diagnostics are actually saying can be a challenge for even the best of mechanics.

One thing I learned in the Air Force about frustration when it comes to finding out what the real problem is so that a solution can be given, is that frustration can become an attitude. I don't like that this thing I do not want is happening, I don't know what to do about it, and I don't want to deal with this right now. We've all been in the vicinity of that scenario, maybe even hundreds of times. And, the reality of being there causes the solution too often to get further away from us, causing, even more, frustration.



What I learned was that the attitude of the diagnostician is critical to the correctness of the diagnosis and the end result of an accurate and speedy repair. We happened to have three such people in our shop. One was the shop foreman who was a calm, confident, and knowledgeable Tech Sergeant who always seemed to have a cup of coffee in his hand. Another was an older civil service veteran, and the last was a young guy my age who came to the shop the same time I did.

This young guy seemed to be happy almost all the time. He laughed a lot and studied his stuff and became in a short time the go-to guy for diagnosis issues. I'll never forget one such issue where several of us tried to solve it, and he stepped in and found it in short order and found the very unique problem in an unanticipated area. It ended up being a piece of carbon stuck in a valve that was part of the early 70's emission system. Remove the little piece of carbon, and the problem left, and the solution came.

The thing that I remember the most about this man and this situation along with others that I watched him take charge of was the attitude with which he approached the problem. He got excited. Frustration was something he didn't even allow. He was interested and challenged in a very positive way. He went at it as if he were mastering a game. It was fun for him. He loved what he was doing, and you could tell by his demeanor that he enjoyed himself, and enjoyed the opportunity to figure it out.

That scenario is embedded in my mind. He was an inspiration to me. I wanted to emulate that attitude toward problems. And, it is also how Abraham & Esther Hicks suggests is the best way to find solutions as well. They state that frustration is a lot of resistance, and here's a quote to end this with that puts it in perspective:

"To be in your natural state of love and appreciation does not require lovable objects for you to focus your attention toward, but only an absence of resistance, which is the only thing that can hinder or mute your natural state of love and appreciation and Well-Being. In the absence of resistant thought, your Vibration returns to its natural state of power and clarity and love. 

In the absence of resistant thought, your true nature of resilience and replenishment and vitality returns. In the absence of resistant thought, your true nature of eagerness and joy and fun returns. 

It is not through struggle and effort and trying that resistance is released, but instead through distraction and releasing and relaxing. 

Over time, your appreciation for the question will become equivalent to your appreciation for the answer, and your appreciation for the problem will become equivalent to your appreciation for the solution. And in your newfound ease with what-is, you will find yourself in the state of allowing what you truly desire. And then, all manner of cooperative components will reveal themselves to you in a delicious co-creative dance of Deliberate Creation." 


My Attitude Toward Contrast Or That Which Is In Front Of Me Has Much To Do With What Happens Next. 

Spread Some Joy Today--Because it feels good. There is no better reason.

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